Got $400 at GCP: I am preparing for Migrate for Compute Engine test

I have activated my GCP sandbox. Received an extra $100! Impressive welcome screen with offerings. The first service I am going to test is Migrate for Compute Engine API to better understand how to move complex workloads from VMware. How different sources such as Hyper-V (Azure Stack HCI) or KVM are supported?

It was super easy to register a GCP account. Few clicks and done. Yes, they ask for your credit card but do not worry, they do not take your money unless you agree.

This is amazing. Got an extra $100 and I am relaxed about unexpected/unwanted future charges while exploring and learning.
Bad news, I need to consume the gift in 91 days. Actually, this is not bad news for me since I will do this anyways. I am here to learn and do something.

How? I will start reading Aga’s blog since she already did this.

I will check the video created by Roger Martinez | LinkedIn

I am going to read and understand the basics:

Migrating individual VMs  |  Migrate for Compute Engine  |  Google Cloud

And especially supported OS versions

Supported operating systems  |  Migrate for Compute Engine  |  Google Cloud

Don’t panic, Windows Server 2022 is not widely used, yet 🙂

List of supported Windows versions for the Migration.
The GCP welcome screen is Amazing. Well done!

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